Scenes from A Governor's Notebook: Industry and Official visits

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Details

Location

Belfast, Enniskillen, Hillsborough

Year

1955

Source

National Museums Northern Ireland

Format

16mm

colour

Length

03min 35sec

Silent

silent

Courtesy

Lord Wakehurst, National Museums Northern Ireland

Rights Holder

Lord Wakehurst, National Museums Northern Ireland

It is illegal to download, copy, print or otherwise utilise in any other form this material, without written consent from the copyright holder.

Description

A glimpse of life as Governor of Northern Ireland. This film allows the viewer to experience the affairs of the Governor and his wife. The industrious pace of the Ulster mills intersects with serene rural prospects and ceremonial spectacles. In a darkened factory, raw flax is transformed into the iconic Irish linens which are inspected in the sunlight.

Meanwhile, the Governor and his wife inspect the Royal Enniskillen Fusiliers and meet the nurses at the District Hospital. Finally after a whirlwind of hand-shaking and small talk, they cruise home to Government House in the Wakehurst’s car.

This film was digitised as part of the BFI's Unlocking Film Heritage project.


 

Notes

These are previously unseen colour rushes from A Governor’s Notebook. The finished film was released in black and white. It is a personal record of scenes that Lord and Lady Wakehurst like to remember from their time in Northern Ireland. During the Royal visit Lord Wakehurst declared a public holiday to encourage as many people as possible to come out and see the new Queen with Prince Phillip. These scenes are a stark contrast to the tight security of future visits.

Digitised as part of the BFI's Unlocking Film Heritage Project   

Credits

Filmed by John de Vere Loder. The second Baron Wakehurst (1895-1970) was Governor of Northern Ireland from 1952-1964. Throughout his life he was a prolific filmmaker who used his privileged access to capture historic moments in glorious colour.

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