Ulster - Whatever Happened to the Moderates?

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Details

Location

Bogside, Dublin

Year

1971

Source

British Film Institute

Format

Digibeta

black and white, colour

Length

27min 11sec

Silent

sound

Courtesy

British Film Institute

Rights Holder

British Film Institute

It is illegal to download, copy, print or otherwise utilise in any other form this material, without written consent from the copyright holder.

Description

Can John Hume’s campaign of civil disobedience challenge the political status quo and take violence off the streets of Northern Ireland?

Watch an insightful profile of John Hume as an advocate of change through non-violent means.  In Hume's opinion there was no military solution to the problems that beset Northern Irish society. Instead, we here see him promote passive resistance, including the instigation of a rent strike. He believed that through such protests the silent majority could make their voice heard. However some believe Hume is a man who pleads pacifism, but whose actions "keep the pot boiling".  
 

Notes

This film is from the BFI collection. It is part of the Thames current affairs television series ‘This Week’, broadcast to a UK audience. The programme provides context on the society and events which, from the late-1960s onwards, shaped John Hume's political ideology. Initially, Hume was an integral figure within Northern Ireland's civil rights movement and widely recognised as a moderate voice in NI politics. However, over time, and with the escalation of violence, his stance began to shift. He is presented here as someone who steadfastly refuses to accept the authority of the Northern Irish government. He was awarded the 1998 Nobel Peace Prize for his pivotal role in the Northern Ireland Peace Process.

Credits

Digitised as part of Unlocking Film Heritage.

Produced by Thames Television.

Llew Gardner: Reporter

John  Hume: Interviewee

Albert Anderson: Interviewee

Ian Martin: Producer

Links