Counterpoint: The Good Life

Counterpoint: The Good Life

Sorry, this film is not available for viewing in your region

Unfortunately, due to copyright permissions we are unable to show this video in your area.

Details

Location

Belfast, Campbell College, High Street, Jaeger Store, Porsche Dealership

Year

1989

Date

Transmission 19/01/1989

Length

25min 56sec

Audio

sound

Format

1 inch

colour

Source

Digitised as part of the UTV Archive Partnership Project (ITV, Northern Ireland Screen and PRONI)

Courtesy

Department for Communities, ITV, Public Record Office of Northern Ireland

Rights Holder

ITV

It is illegal to download, copy, print or otherwise utilise in any other form this material, without written consent from the copyright holder.

Description

Presenter Brian Black explores the gulf between the "haves and the have nots in Northern Ireland" by speaking to some of Belfast's middle-class. 

A question asked is, if Northern Ireland has higher poverty, illness and unemployment levels than almost everywhere else "in the European community" why do the middle-classes stay and where does their money come from? Beginning the programme at Campbell College's annual ball which as "produced some of Northern Ireland's most successful men", Counterpoint interviews "old Campbellians" about the preferences they have when awarding jobs and what could be perceived as cliquishness. 

Sharon Hall reports from the Jaeger store, Belfast, where employee Lynda Boyce gives an insight into their customers who vary in age but who are eager to spend, with Belfast's store being one of their highest turnover branches, outside of London. Likewise, at the Porsche dealership, Robbert Ferris says that their clients are "slightly extrovert, well to do and keen to enjoy their wealth". 

However, reasons for such abundance of disposable income alongside unemployment is due to the lower cost in living but same income as those across the water. Paddy and Colette McCrossan are amazed to find that their family puts them into the top 20% of households in NI but acknowledges that what she considers "affluent" is all relative. 

Concluding the programme, we are back at Campbell College with Headmaster Dr. Ivan Pollock, who discusses how their results measure up to public schools in England such as Eton and how they send a good proportion to their students to Oxford and Cambridge. The problem is, as David Oldfield, careers advisor, mentions, is in getting these high achieving men to come back with to Northern Ireland after university.

 

Credits

A UTV Production

Producer, Jamie Delargy 

Director: Tony Boyle 


 

Links

×

Please scroll to review and accept our terms and conditions (last updated on ) before viewing the moving images content.

To remember your terms and conditions acceptance, you can register as a site member or allow cookies on your browser.